Sedition.

In the Halsbury’s Law of England Sedition has been defined as follows, “Sedition is a misdemeanour at common law consisting of acts done, words spoken and published, or writings capable of being a libel published, in each case with an intention i)  to bring into hatred or to excite disaffection against , the queen or Read More …

Doctrine of Identification

The concept of Doctrine of Identification finds its roots in the English Law. The growth of this doctrine has helped in the implication and prosecution of the criminal activities of directors / managers of many companies. The corporate personality of a company is different and separate from the promoters, directors or owners of the company. Read More …

STATUTORY INTERPRETATION.

In his chapter in Historical Foundations of Australian Law, Mr J.S. Emmett similarly observes that: “There was no notion in the 13th century that statutes needed to come from two houses of Parliament. Rather, there was a range of different statutory instruments by which the King might give law, including charters (by which the King Read More …

INTRODUCTION TO STATUTORY INTERPRETATION

Legislation is the predominant source of law applied by judges in the common law world today. This is because, even though the doctrine of precedent allows for the development of law by judges through cases, most areas of law are now set down in statutes, and cases primarily concerning their interpretation. Accordingly, advanced skills in Read More …